NASCAR

Wendell Scott, Rusty Wallace lead NASCAR Hall of Fame nominees

April 11, 2012 

  • NASCAR Hall of Fame Class of 2013 nominations Buck Baker: First driver to win consecutive NASCAR premier (now Sprint Cup) series championships (1956-57) Red Byron: Won first NASCAR premier series championship in 1949. Richard Childress: 11-time car owner champion in NASCAR’s three national series. Jerry Cook: Six-time NASCAR Modified champion. H. Clay Earles: Founder of Martinsville Speedway. Tim Flock: Two-time NASCAR premier series champion. Ray Fox: Former NASCAR owner, engine builder and official. Anne B. France: First secretary and treasurer of NASCAR, wife of founder Bill France Sr. Rick Hendrick: 13-time car-owner champion in NASCAR’s three national series. Jack Ingram: Two-time NASCAR Busch (now Nationwide) Series champion. Bobby Isaac: 1970 NASCAR premier series champion. Fred Lorenzen: 26 wins and winner of the Daytona 500 and World 600. Cotton Owens: Driver-owner, won 1966 owner championship with David Pearson. Raymond Parks: NASCAR’s first champion car owner. Benny Parsons: 1973 NASCAR premier series champion. Les Richter: Former NASCAR executive; former president of Riverside International Raceway. Fireball Roberts: Won 33 NASCAR premier series races, including the 1962 Daytona 500. T. Wayne Robertson: Helped raise NASCAR popularity as R.J. Reynolds Senior VP. Wendell Scott: First African-American to win a NASCAR premier series event. Ralph Seagraves: Former president of R.J. Reynolds who introduced corporate sponsorship to NASCAR’s premier series. Herb Thomas: First two-time NASCAR premier series champion in 1951 and 1953 Curtis Turner: Early personality, called the “Babe Ruth of stock car racing.” Rusty Wallace: 1989 NASCAR premier series champion; finished career with 55 wins and 36 poles. Joe Weatherly: Two-time NASCAR premier series champion Leonard Wood: Part-owner and former crew chief for Wood Brothers; revolutionized pit stops.

jutter@charlotteobserver.com

Wendell Scott, the first and only African-American to win a race in NASCAR’s premier series and the 1989 series champion, Rusty Wallace, lead the list of new nominees for the NASCAR Hall of Fame’s Class of 2013.

The five-member class will be selected from among the 25 nominees released on Wednesday.

Five new nominees along with 20 members from last season’s list of nominees as well with five new names added.

Joining Scott and Wallace as new nominees are former NASCAR owner, engine builder and official, Ray Fox; Ralph Seagraves, the former president of R.J. Reynolds who helped NASCAR land its first corporate sponsor for the Cup series; and Anne B. France, NASCAR’s first secretary and treasurer, and wife of NASCAR founder Bill France Sr.

Since the NASCAR Hall of Fame opened in Charlotte, three five-member classes have been inducted.

Those already inducted are Bill France Sr., Richard Petty, Bill France Jr., Dale Earnhardt, Junior Johnson, David Pearson, Bobby Allison, Lee Petty, Ned Jarrett, Bud Moore, Cale Yarborough, Darrell Waltrip, Dale Inman, Richie Evans and Glen Wood.

Jarrett said he was “very pleased” to hear of Scott’s nomination.

“I always admired Wendell for doing as much as he did with as little as he had to do it with. He never had top notch equipment,” Jarrett said.

“I felt that he would have won more races if he had the same backing that I had at the highlight of my career.”

In 1961, Scott moved up to the NASCAR Grand National (now Cup) division. In the 1963 season, he finished 15th in points, and on Dec. 1 of that year, driving a Chevrolet purchased from Jarrett, he won a race on the 1-mile dirt track in Jacksonville, Fla.

Wallace said he was “extremely honored” to be nominated for the Hall.

“This really means a lot to me and my family,” said Wallace, who won 55 races in the Cup series. “There are a lot of people that have helped me to get to this point.

“I just really want to thank not only the nominating committee, but also all of the great fans, the media, the teams I drove with and all of the other people who have helped me throughout the years.”

The Herald is pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news. Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere in the site or in the newspaper. We encourage lively, open debate on the issues of the day, and ask that you refrain from profanity, hate speech, personal comments and remarks that are off point. Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.

Commenting FAQs | Terms of Service