Harriet Goode poses in the hall gallery of her downtown Rock Hill penthouse. The prominent Rock Hill artist is being recognized with an exhibit at the Center for the Arts, "Sister Marshall: Works by Harriet Goode, 1955 to 2007," that features about 30 works, spanning the years since she was a Converse College freshman. The charcoal drawing of a Michaelangelo plaster cast, above right, was drawn by Goode in 1955. The center work is "Sisters of Another Century," a watercolor from 1984, while the bottom work is a 2007 piece titled "The Air She Breathed was Bent, Twisted."
Harriet Goode poses in the hall gallery of her downtown Rock Hill penthouse. The prominent Rock Hill artist is being recognized with an exhibit at the Center for the Arts, "Sister Marshall: Works by Harriet Goode, 1955 to 2007," that features about 30 works, spanning the years since she was a Converse College freshman. The charcoal drawing of a Michaelangelo plaster cast, above right, was drawn by Goode in 1955. The center work is "Sisters of Another Century," a watercolor from 1984, while the bottom work is a 2007 piece titled "The Air She Breathed was Bent, Twisted."
Harriet Goode poses in the hall gallery of her downtown Rock Hill penthouse. The prominent Rock Hill artist is being recognized with an exhibit at the Center for the Arts, "Sister Marshall: Works by Harriet Goode, 1955 to 2007," that features about 30 works, spanning the years since she was a Converse College freshman. The charcoal drawing of a Michaelangelo plaster cast, above right, was drawn by Goode in 1955. The center work is "Sisters of Another Century," a watercolor from 1984, while the bottom work is a 2007 piece titled "The Air She Breathed was Bent, Twisted."

The very air she breathed was scented with art

September 25, 2007 12:03 AM

UPDATED September 25, 2007 12:07 AM

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