A police button, left, is among the relics discovered by members of the local S.C. Metal Detector and Relic Association, which met Feb. 5 at Rock Hill's Trinity Bible Church on Cherry Road. For more information, contact Chris Watson, 328-5764, or Jeff Kleparek, (803) 389-4178, or visit the Web site, scmetaldetectingclub.com. The group is open to anyone interested in metal detecting, relic hunting, gold panning or general history.
A police button, left, is among the relics discovered by members of the local S.C. Metal Detector and Relic Association, which met Feb. 5 at Rock Hill's Trinity Bible Church on Cherry Road. For more information, contact Chris Watson, 328-5764, or Jeff Kleparek, (803) 389-4178, or visit the Web site, scmetaldetectingclub.com. The group is open to anyone interested in metal detecting, relic hunting, gold panning or general history.
A police button, left, is among the relics discovered by members of the local S.C. Metal Detector and Relic Association, which met Feb. 5 at Rock Hill's Trinity Bible Church on Cherry Road. For more information, contact Chris Watson, 328-5764, or Jeff Kleparek, (803) 389-4178, or visit the Web site, scmetaldetectingclub.com. The group is open to anyone interested in metal detecting, relic hunting, gold panning or general history.

Friday art auction to benefit Winthrop award

February 09, 2008 11:31 PM

UPDATED February 09, 2008 11:45 PM

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