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  • Women with ovarian cancer who take oral contraceptives may have better outcomes, according to study

    For decades, women have taken oral contraceptives as a method of birth control and to treat a number of other conditions. Multiple studies have shown that taking the pill is associated with a reduced risk of ovarian cancer. In a new study, Mayo Clinic experts report that women who develop ovarian cancer and also have a history of taking oral contraceptives may have better outcomes. Reporter Vivien Williams has more on this study, which is giving hope to some women diagnosed with this disease.

Women with ovarian cancer who take oral contraceptives may have better outcomes, according to study

For decades, women have taken oral contraceptives as a method of birth control and to treat a number of other conditions. Multiple studies have shown that taking the pill is associated with a reduced risk of ovarian cancer. In a new study, Mayo Clinic experts report that women who develop ovarian cancer and also have a history of taking oral contraceptives may have better outcomes. Reporter Vivien Williams has more on this study, which is giving hope to some women diagnosed with this disease.
Mayo Clinic