FILE - In this Jan. 29, 2018 file photo, foam images of the MLB baseball Cleveland Indians' mascot Chief Wahoo are displayed for sale at the Indians' team shop in Cleveland. The Chief Wahoo logo is being removed from the Cleveland Indians' uniform in the 2019 season, but the Club will still sell merchandise featuring the mascot in Northeast Ohio. The U.S. has spent most of 2019 coming to grips with blackface and racist imagery, but Native Americans say they don't see significant pressure applied to those who perpetuate Native American stereotypes.
FILE - In this Jan. 29, 2018 file photo, foam images of the MLB baseball Cleveland Indians' mascot Chief Wahoo are displayed for sale at the Indians' team shop in Cleveland. The Chief Wahoo logo is being removed from the Cleveland Indians' uniform in the 2019 season, but the Club will still sell merchandise featuring the mascot in Northeast Ohio. The U.S. has spent most of 2019 coming to grips with blackface and racist imagery, but Native Americans say they don't see significant pressure applied to those who perpetuate Native American stereotypes. Tony Dejak, File AP Photo
FILE - In this Jan. 29, 2018 file photo, foam images of the MLB baseball Cleveland Indians' mascot Chief Wahoo are displayed for sale at the Indians' team shop in Cleveland. The Chief Wahoo logo is being removed from the Cleveland Indians' uniform in the 2019 season, but the Club will still sell merchandise featuring the mascot in Northeast Ohio. The U.S. has spent most of 2019 coming to grips with blackface and racist imagery, but Native Americans say they don't see significant pressure applied to those who perpetuate Native American stereotypes. Tony Dejak, File AP Photo