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Glory days? Even in their 70s, these Sun City guys aren't sitting on the bench.

75-year-old Vietnam vet completes 'phenomenal' goal in Indian Land

75-year-old Sidney Doobrow earned his first degree black belt earlier last month at Kenaki Karate Studio in Indian Land. The Vietnam veteran graduated from the beginner’s white belt to a Sensei’s black belt more than two years ago.
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75-year-old Sidney Doobrow earned his first degree black belt earlier last month at Kenaki Karate Studio in Indian Land. The Vietnam veteran graduated from the beginner’s white belt to a Sensei’s black belt more than two years ago.

Two men, now in their 70s, are proving you are never too old to do what you love.

Sidney Doobrow, 75, and Dohrman Sinclair, 76, have come far both in the karate dojo and on the baseball field, respectively. Both men live in the Sun City Carolina Lakes community in Indian Land.

Doobrow’s Swift Kick

Doobrow is a retired salesman who earned his black belt earlier last month at Kenaki Karate Studio in Indian Land. The Vietnam War veteran needed a way to fill his time that would promote a healthy lifestyle, and karate seemed to be the perfect fit.

“I’ve always been active and I still ride a bike, I do volunteer work and I still had time left over," Doobrow said. "I don’t like watching television so I had to find something and this fit the bill."

Doobrow graduated from the beginner’s white belt to a Sensei’s black belt after his wife signed him up more than two years ago.

Receiving his black belt is only the beginning for Doobrow. He hopes to learn the remainder of his katas, or choreographed karate moves, and eventually help train those much younger than him.

“Getting my black belt was a goal, but it’s also just a start. Now I really start my karate career, which is learning the two katas and start teaching it,” Doobrow said.

Doobrow still has a long way to go, but he has already made an impact on those at Kenaki Karate Studio.

Owner and Grandmaster Shihan White only had one word in mind to describe Doobrow and all he has accomplished.

“The word that comes to mind is 'phenomenal' because most people have some type of excuse or reason why they can’t get off the couch, why they can’t kick or punch and why they can’t enjoy learning the life skills that we teach,” White said. “Mr. Sid did not use anything as an excuse or reason. He just did it.”

Doobrow hopes to earn his first degree black belt in a year or two, eventually moving up to a third degree black belt.

As Doobrow continues to train at Kenaki Karate and improve, he has a message for those who think they are too old to accomplish their goals.

“Just get up and do it; you’re never too old," he said. "You just got to get up and go live life, that’s what it’s about...live life.”

Sinclair steps to the plate

Dohrman Sinclair was inducted into the 2016 Men’s Senior Baseball League, bringing honor to a career that has spanned more than 65 years.

Sinclair began his baseball career at the age of 9 in Little League and has stepped up to the plate since.

He was captain of his high school baseball team in Stueubenville, Ohio in 1960. He then went on to play American Legion baseball, which brings amateur baseball players ages 13-19 throughout the country together to play over the summer.

Sinclair’s days of playing baseball even led to a tryout for a Minor League team.

“I had one minor tryout, but that was the end of that. Then I worked for the next 40 years and in 2003, after covering 50 states in my job, I had six heart bypasses. That told me it was time to slow down a bit."

Sinclair moved to Arizona, but his plan to slow down didn't last very long. In 2005, he began playing for the MSBL while also coaching three different teams. He has not stopped since.

Sinclair’s love of baseball comes not from the love of the game, but from the competition.

“I’m not like everybody else. I like to win. I’ll have fun after we win,” he said.

Sinclair's competitive spirit led to him being inducted into the MSBL 2016 Hall of Fame.

“I was totally surprised first of all, and I was honored because there were a lot of other people that deserved it more than me. But I don’t carry that around in my back and say that I’m with the Hall of Fame,” he said. “It’s just a nice thing that’s happened to me and now I just have to continue to prove myself.”

Sinclair proves himself everyday he steps onto the field at the age of 76.

“It’s just a blessing to still be able to play and I will play as long as I don’t embarrass the rest of my teammates,” he said.

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