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‘Shark! Shark! Shark!’: South Carolina man gets bitten on the head, shares attack video

Scared of sharks? Here are 7 tips to reduce your chances of getting bit

The chances of getting bit by a shark while swimming in the ocean are very, very slim. Just in case, and to hopefully ease your mind, here are a few tips from the International Shark Attack File to reduce your chances of getting bit.
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The chances of getting bit by a shark while swimming in the ocean are very, very slim. Just in case, and to hopefully ease your mind, here are a few tips from the International Shark Attack File to reduce your chances of getting bit.

A South Carolina man was spearfishing in the Bahamas over the summer when a shark swam up and bit his head.

Will Krause, of Greenville, wrote on Facebook, “3 months ago (Aug 20, 2018), I survived a shark attack to the head while spearfishing in the Abacos. I was 25 feet below the surface when the 6-7 ft Reef Shark struck the back of my head & neck. I miraculously escaped with several stitches, some gnarly scars, & a viral GoPro video.”

The GoPro video, caught by Zach Shipp, shows the shark swim up to Krause and bite him on the back of the head before quickly swimming away. “Shark! Shark! Shark!” Shipp says in the video, according to Newsweek.

Krause comes to the surface in the video clutching his head and his fellow divers help him to the boat.

Speaking to NBC News over the weekend, Krause said, “I felt a huge impact on my head and my neck.”

“I didn’t process it was a shark bite until I got to the surface,” he told NBC.

“I could see a lot of blood around me,” he told the network.

Krause posted the video to YouTube just before Thanksgiving. He wrote on Facebook the next day, “While encounters like this certainly shift your perspective, it doesn’t take a shark attack to recognize God’s generosity & intentionality in our lives. May this Thanksgiving point you NOT just to the reality that you are blessed, but to the One who is giving the blessing.”

A photo shared on Facebook shows Krause with a bandaged head and bloodied shirt after he got back on shore.

Charles Duncan: 843-626-0301, @duncanreporting

This video from late February 2018 documents the discovery of a humpback whale carcass nearly 30 miles off Cumberland Island, and how sharks -- including some large great whites -- quickly scavenged the 28-foot-long whale until little was left.



Great white sharks spending time in far northern waters near Nova Scotia are beginning to migrate south, and one — Jefferson the shark — has already made it to Cape Hatteras, North Carolina.

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