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Tree Tops for active seniors, ‘inspired by nature,’ opens in Indian Land

Tree Tops draws seniors with 'natural aesthetic' in Indian Land

Lennar Homes unveiled its newest active senior adult community, Tree Tops, Saturday in Indian Land at an open house. The community has nearly 800 homesites on 613 acres, which was formerly a camp for disadvantaged children. The community utilized
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Lennar Homes unveiled its newest active senior adult community, Tree Tops, Saturday in Indian Land at an open house. The community has nearly 800 homesites on 613 acres, which was formerly a camp for disadvantaged children. The community utilized

The echoes of children squealing through the forest and splashing in the lake at summer camp have faded, but the outdoor atmosphere and natural beauty of the great outdoors is still alive and well in Indian Land.

The bunkbeds in the camp cabins have been replaced with sewing, card and nature rooms for Tree Tops, the new active senior adult community between Indian Land and Van Wyck.

The 613-acre age-restricted community by Lennar replaces the former TreeTops children’s camp for disadvantaged children at the site, with new tenants ages 55 and older.

The community is touted as “inspired by nature,” and has preserved 60 percent of the natural greenspace, which includes walking trails and a 10-acre lake.

“We know that today’s active adult considers nature and health to be very important,” Veronica Perez, director of sales and marketing said Saturday at the community’s grand opening.

Tree Tops has nearly 800 homesites in three collections, with homes ranging from 1,436 to 3,619 square feet and cost $264,000 to $391,500 in the gated community.

The “resort-style” amenities include pickleball, hiking trails, a putting green and waterfront amphitheater, and the “Tree House” will feature a fitness center and pool.

“Active adults are a significant and positive part of any community,” said Jon Hardy, president of Lennar’s Charlotte Division. “As a group, they have a low impact on area schools and traffic, while often providing an outstanding contribution of volunteer efforts.”

Lennar donated $1,252,500 to enhance Lancaster County’s public safety and school district, which was part of the acquisition and development.

U.S. Rep. Mick Mulvaney of Indian Land told new and future home buyers on Saturday that the town is “changing fairly rapidly, but it’s changing in a really, really good way.”

Like many newer senior living communities that target adults who want to socialize and stay active, Perez said the goal is to provide ways for the residents to keep their minds and bodies engaged.

“It’s absolutely a bonding moment where they can choose to be as involved as they want to be involved...but they are not isolated,” she said.

Future resident Judy Casey and other homeowners planted apple, pear and pecan trees Saturday in the community’s “Founder’s Orchard.”

The smaller one-story homes and a beautiful setting is what drew Casey to the new community, she said, especially the decision to renovate one of the cabins into a sewing center.

“It was really easy to decide,” she said. “You had me at sewing.”

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