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Hot & dry? You betcha!

Gus Perez takes a break from roofing to cool off with a cold drink on a hot Tuesday. Forecasters say the area's in for more scorching heat, as highs today and Thursday could reach 100.
Gus Perez takes a break from roofing to cool off with a cold drink on a hot Tuesday. Forecasters say the area's in for more scorching heat, as highs today and Thursday could reach 100.

The sweat dripping off your brow is likely a welcome sight to the parched ground beneath your feet.

It seems the area has seen more temperature records fall than raindrops this month, and the effects are starting to show. Droopy plants in Chester, dying grass in Rock Hill and dry creek beds along Lake Wylie are sights as common as triple-digit temperatures on backyard thermometers.

"It's definitely been a long stretch of abnormally high temperatures," said National Weather Service forecaster Pat Moore.

It's been dry, too. It hasn't rained more than a trace since July 30, when about half an inch fell, according to the NWS.

The Catawba River Basin is in a Stage One drought, the least-severe drought rating, and officials are asking everyone to cut back on water and electricity usage.

On Lake Wylie, boaters are being told to slow down and watch for stumps and sand bars as lake levels plummet more than five feet below normal.

According to the Catawba Riverkeeper Foundation, the river and its lakes are already experiencing algae blooms, boat ramp closings, marina docks bottoming out, boats stranded in mud and boat damage as more hazards come closer to the surface.

Don't expect conditions to change for a few more days. Tuesday's high temperature was 96 degrees, according to the NWS, and forecasters predict today's and Thursday's temperatures might top 100 degrees.

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