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York 5-year-old honored for 911 call that saved mom

Alexis Lingerfelt, 5, sits by her mother, Stephanie, as they listen to a tape of Alexis' 911 call. Alexis was honored as a hero Wednesday for calling 911 as her mother suffered a seizure.
Alexis Lingerfelt, 5, sits by her mother, Stephanie, as they listen to a tape of Alexis' 911 call. Alexis was honored as a hero Wednesday for calling 911 as her mother suffered a seizure.

YORK -- When 5-year-old Alexis Lingerfelt heard her mother collapse in the hallway because of a seizure in July, she called 911 remembering what her family taught her earlier that morning.

"Help. My mommy just fell on the floor, and I need an ambulance," Alexis told a dispatcher that morning. "She fell, and she's just sitting there. I said, 'Mommy, Mommy,' and she won't answer me."

Alexis stayed calm during the more than 6-minute call and even went outside to direct the ambulance to the York residence.

"I wasn't scared (to call 911). I was scared because I didn't want my mommy to get hurt," Alexis said.

York County Emergency Management honored Alexis with a "Hero Award" on Wednesday for her role in supplying help at a critical time for her mother, Stephanie Lingerfelt.

Lingerfelt, who is 5 months pregnant, said the pregnancy caused epilepsy and brought on seizures. She had started taking medication, but her body hadn't adjusted to it.

Before noon July 12, Lingerfelt said she was alone with her daughter at her mother's house when she had an attack.

"I don't remember much about what happened," she said. "I went into a seizure and fell into the shelf in the hallway. Alexis heard me fall. She called 911."

Lingerfelt, who teared up while listening to her daughter's call for the first time Wednesday, said her husband and sister each taught Alexis to call 911 that morning because they were nervous about the seizures.

"My husband taught her, 'If mommy gets sick, falls or doesn't respond, you call 911 and tell them mommy has a baby in her belly and she has seizures and fell down,'" Lingerfelt said.

The home-schooled kindergartner said, "I know the number is 9-1-1. I was told how to call it."

Alexis stayed calm and followed the dispatcher's instructions. She also talked to the dog, then, finally, her mother.

When Lingerfelt woke up, Alexis was talking to the dispatcher. She was told Alexis went to the end of the driveway to ensure the ambulance found the right residence.

Lingerfelt, who has been seizure-free for about a month, is very proud of her daughter.

"I didn't expect it out of her," she said.

Candie Jurey, public information officer for York County Emergency Management, said the 911 center doesn't have a lot of child callers.

"It's sporadic. It just varies," she said. "But when it does happen, we like to honor them."

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