Local

Chester Co. sheriff’s program on TV again. See it on Viceland network

TV show goes inside Chester County sheriff's program that targets troubled youth

A national television audience is getting a look at a program run by the Chester County Sheriff’s Office, aimed to keep children in trouble from future problems. The Viceland network show “Hate Thy Neighbor” aired the premiere of an episode about
Up Next
A national television audience is getting a look at a program run by the Chester County Sheriff’s Office, aimed to keep children in trouble from future problems. The Viceland network show “Hate Thy Neighbor” aired the premiere of an episode about

Yes television viewers, those cops yelling at kids are from Chester County.

Again.

Another national television audience is getting a look at a program run by the Chester County Sheriff’s Office aimed to change the path of young people who seem headed for trouble. The Viceland network show “Hate Thy Neighbor” is broadcasting over the weekend an episode about the sheriff’s office Project STORM.

STORM stands for Showing Teens Our Real Mission.

The Chester program was featured in 2014 on A&E Network’s “Beyond Scared Straight,” and in 2016 on the “Steve Harvey” television show.

Chester County Sheriff Alex Underwood instituted Project Storm after his 2012 election. The tough-love program shows teens who get in minor trouble a glimpse of jail life and what could be their future if they don’t shape up.

The sheriff’s office on Facebook says this mission is “Jail for one night to stay out for life.”

Teens and their parents have to sign up for the program. Deputies volunteer their time. Underwood said the program has been successful.

“The whole idea is to save kids from future trouble,” Underwood said.

Viceland approached the sheriff’s office in 2017 about filming and spent about a week gathering video. The show airs often at different times on the network. The next scheduled broadcast is 2 p.m. Wednesday.

“Most of the response we have received on the show has been good from the community,” said Robert Sprouse, chief deputy.

  Comments