Marc Leepson, a historian and author of “Flag: A Biography,” sees a difference in American sentiment about the flag versus other countries and their own flags. It isn’t just the omnipresence of the flag, but the devotion paid to it, from the incredibly detailed federal flag code on how to handle it to the country’s national anthem which pays tribute to it, to the nationally recognized day set aside for the sole purpose of honoring it. “One hundred percent, I can’t think of another symbol that unites America more,” he said. “A lot of it is emotional. The emotions transcend your political views.”
Marc Leepson, a historian and author of “Flag: A Biography,” sees a difference in American sentiment about the flag versus other countries and their own flags. It isn’t just the omnipresence of the flag, but the devotion paid to it, from the incredibly detailed federal flag code on how to handle it to the country’s national anthem which pays tribute to it, to the nationally recognized day set aside for the sole purpose of honoring it. “One hundred percent, I can’t think of another symbol that unites America more,” he said. “A lot of it is emotional. The emotions transcend your political views.” Gerry Broome AP
Marc Leepson, a historian and author of “Flag: A Biography,” sees a difference in American sentiment about the flag versus other countries and their own flags. It isn’t just the omnipresence of the flag, but the devotion paid to it, from the incredibly detailed federal flag code on how to handle it to the country’s national anthem which pays tribute to it, to the nationally recognized day set aside for the sole purpose of honoring it. “One hundred percent, I can’t think of another symbol that unites America more,” he said. “A lot of it is emotional. The emotions transcend your political views.” Gerry Broome AP

Even in fractured land, there’s much unity

August 08, 2016 08:13 AM