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Rock Hill’s 139 Main apartments feature art from Winthrop student, Springs Creative

Rock Hill 139 Main apartment building features unique art

The new 139 Main apartment building in downtown Rock Hill features artistic elements from a Winthrop University graduate student and based on fabric swatches in the archives of Springs Creative.
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The new 139 Main apartment building in downtown Rock Hill features artistic elements from a Winthrop University graduate student and based on fabric swatches in the archives of Springs Creative.

A new downtown Rock Hill apartment building at the site of the former F.W. Woolworth store features artistic touches from a Winthrop University student and Springs Creative.

“We wanted to incorporate some local flavor,” developer Skip Tuttle told city officials, employees of Springs Creative and others Thursday, during a tour of the 139 Main building.

The first-floor lobby, which opens onto a parking lot at the rear of the four-story Main Street building, features a metal geometric wall scuplture made by Winthrop University graduate student Jill Gottschalk, Tuttle said.

The hallways outside the apartments are decorated with 16 four-by-eight-foot panels created by Springs Creative, which enlarged selected fabric swatches from its archive and digitally printed and mounted them.

The estimated $3.7 million apartment building project, which opened last month, was developed by The Tuttle Co. and Lat Purser & Associates of Charlotte.

The one-bedroom apartments and a single two-bedroom apartment range in size from 582 to 1,035 square feet; rental rates range from $875 to $1,500 according to the Lat Purser website, mynichepartemnts.com.

Tuttle said his company commissioned Gottschalk to make the lobby piece for the wall space. “We just kind of turned her loose and said go do it,” he said.

He said the project designer approached Springs Creative about using images of fabric swatches from its archive of hundreds of fabrics.

Tuttle said the designer chose 16 swatches that would complement the building’s color scheme.

“From a distance, it looks like a piece of modern art,” he said.

Springs Creative CEO Derick Close said the project has been a great way for his company to demonstrate its history and its modern capabilities.

Close said the company already does digital printing for New York fashion houses.

“This is a great showcase for local talent, combined with modern techniques and local creative entrepreneurship,” Close said.

The 37-unit building includes 10-foot ceilings, modern kitchens and private balconies. Tuttle said the complex is already about 70 percent leased.

Development of the Woolworth site was a long-term goal for Rock Hill Economic Development Corp., which owned the site for 25 years before deciding to demolish it in 2014. The Woolworth lunch counter and the old McCrory’s lunch counter next door were the scenes of civil rights protests in 1961.

Jennifer Becknell: 803-329-4077

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