In this Dec. 11, 2018, photo the parents of Yariza Flores, 11, show where the girl cut her torso as she landed on barbed wire while crossing the border illegally, after arriving from an immigration detention center to a shelter in San Diego. Since late October 2016, the U.S. has been releasing asylum-seeking families with little time to arrange travel, which it blames on lack of detention space. To avoid putting penniless families on the streets, charities and advocacy groups from California to Texas are scrambling to provide shelter, food, clothes and help buying bus and plane tickets.
In this Dec. 11, 2018, photo the parents of Yariza Flores, 11, show where the girl cut her torso as she landed on barbed wire while crossing the border illegally, after arriving from an immigration detention center to a shelter in San Diego. Since late October 2016, the U.S. has been releasing asylum-seeking families with little time to arrange travel, which it blames on lack of detention space. To avoid putting penniless families on the streets, charities and advocacy groups from California to Texas are scrambling to provide shelter, food, clothes and help buying bus and plane tickets. Gregory Bull AP Photo
In this Dec. 11, 2018, photo the parents of Yariza Flores, 11, show where the girl cut her torso as she landed on barbed wire while crossing the border illegally, after arriving from an immigration detention center to a shelter in San Diego. Since late October 2016, the U.S. has been releasing asylum-seeking families with little time to arrange travel, which it blames on lack of detention space. To avoid putting penniless families on the streets, charities and advocacy groups from California to Texas are scrambling to provide shelter, food, clothes and help buying bus and plane tickets. Gregory Bull AP Photo