South Carolina

4 great white sharks gather off SC coast ... maybe for some New Year’s lovin’?

Meet George: The first mature male great white shark tagged by OCEARCH

Meet George, the first mature male white shark SPOT tagged in the Atlantic Ocean. George was named for Chris Fischer’s father who has supported OCEARCH since the beginning.
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Meet George, the first mature male white shark SPOT tagged in the Atlantic Ocean. George was named for Chris Fischer’s father who has supported OCEARCH since the beginning.

Mary Lee, the internet’s most popular shark, is hosting a New Year’s Eve party in the Lowcountry, apparently.

Four great white sharks have pinged their location off the South Carolina coast recently, according to OCEARCH’s tracking.

And this time there are two male sharks joining in.

George, a mature 702-pound, 10-foot male great white shark, has moved close to shore, pinging his location just east of Hunting Island on Wednesday, according to OCEARCH’s tracking.

George is a shark making history. He was the first male great white tagged in the Atlantic Ocean by OCEARCH.

He was named after OCEARCH leader Chris Fischer’s father and is on a quest to find Mary Lee, who was named after Fischer’s mother, according to his Twitter profile.

And he’s close. Mary Lee, the 16-foot 3,500-pound shark with more than 102,000 Twitter followers, has been hanging out in the area since September. She last pinged her location on Dec. 22 further off coast between Tybee Island and Hilton Head Island.

Shark love? It’s possible. But they aren’t the only sharks out there.

Yeti, a young 960-pound, 11-foot female great white shark, last pinged her location just east of Hilton Head Island on Sunday, according to OCEARCH’s tracking.

And just north of Charleston, another young great white shark was spotted cruising through the Atlantic recently. Cisco, a 360-pound, 8.5-foot male shark pinged his location off the Isle of Palms coast on Dec. 24.

George, Yeti, and Cisco were all tagged near Nantucket, Mass., in October and have each made a fast track south in the last three months, traveling more than 900 miles.

The great white sharks are being tracked by OCEARCH through Expedition Nantucket, an initiative to provide a broader understanding of the ecology, physiology and behavior of the north Atlantic great white.

You can track their adventures through the Atlantic here.

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