South Carolina

Mom texted photos of baby with cord around its neck, now can’t see her kids, SC cops say

Do you know the signs of child abuse & neglect? Here are 10 things to look for

The South Carolina Department of Social Services lists numerous signs of child abuse and neglect. Here are 10 signs to look for if you suspect a school-aged child is being abused.
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The South Carolina Department of Social Services lists numerous signs of child abuse and neglect. Here are 10 signs to look for if you suspect a school-aged child is being abused.

A South Carolina mother has been ordered to have no contact with any of her three children, according to police.

The judge’s order came after Sharika Renee Caldwell texted pictures where she was threatening the life of her infant child, the Spartanburg Police Department reported.

The 36-year-old Spartanburg woman took a picture of the infant “with a cord wrapped around her neck” and texted it with a message that read “U saw the pics so if he doesn’t come and get her then she’s gone,” according to an incident report.

In a second picture that was shared in a text, Caldwell was pointing a knife at the infant and that message said “Dont worry about it. I’ll just finish choking her. He not gonna come so its all good.”

The man Caldwell was referring to was the child’s father, Maj. Art D. Littlejohn said in an interview with The State Thursday. Littlejohn said Caldwell sent the text messages to a family member or friend, without specifically revealing that person’s identity.

The Department of Social Services was contacted and given copies of the texts, police reported. Both DSS and police officers interviewed Caldwell Tuesday before she was arrested.

Caldwell was taken to Spartanburg County Detention Center, where she was charged with child neglect, according to jail records. Littlejohn said she was released on $5,000 bond and ordered to have no contact with minors.

Two of her children were placed with their father, while the third child was placed with an aunt, according to the incident report.

Whether someone has asked you for help or you sense someone is in distress, here are some general guidelines to help support possible victims of abuse, be it physical, emotional, sexual, psychological or financial.



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Noah Feit is a Real Time reporter with The State and McClatchy Carolinas Regional Team. The award-winning journalist has worked for multiple newspapers since starting his career in 1999.


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