South Carolina

Tropical weather is brewing. Here’s when NOAA will release 2019 hurricane forecast

The Carolinas’ costliest hurricanes

Hurricane Florence swept into the Carolinas in 2018 and caused extensive damage in both states. Florence set a record for the costliest storm to hit the Carolinas. Here's a look at other costly hurricanes.
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Hurricane Florence swept into the Carolinas in 2018 and caused extensive damage in both states. Florence set a record for the costliest storm to hit the Carolinas. Here's a look at other costly hurricanes.

Get ready, Carolinas — hurricane season is around the corner!

The month of May “makes all the difference” in the upcoming hurricane season forecast, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Hurricane season begins June 1 and runs through Nov. 30, and predictions for the year will be released later this month, though other agencies have released early forecasts for 2019.

The National Weather Service’s Hurricane Center issued Wednesday a “special tropical weather outlook” for the Atlantic as a system is expected to move up from the Bahamas to the Florida Peninsula over the next two days, bringing showers and thunderstorms. The system has a low chance of development during the next five days, NOAA reports.

Colorado State University published an early forecast in April, predicting slightly below-normal activity in the Atlantic basin, while AccuWeather forecasters say the season will be slightly above average, bringing 12 to 14 possible storms.

NOAA released 21 names for potential storms that could form in the Atlantic Ocean this season, including Andrea, Fernand, Olga and Wendy.

Hurricane Florence pounded the Myrtle Beach area in September, bringing days of flooding and destruction to inland Horry County homes, churches and businesses. The flooding caused millions of dollars worth of damage.

Floodwaters from Hurricane Florence's deluge of rain crest in the seat of Horry County, Conway, S.C.

The Sun News Reporter Hannah Strong is passionate about making the world better through what she reports and writes. Strong, who is a Pawleys Island native, is quick to jump on breaking news, profiles stories about people in the community and obituaries. Strong has won four S.C. Press Association first-place awards, including one for enterprise reporting after riding along with police during a homicide. She earned a bachelor’s degree in communications from Winthrop University.

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