South Carolina

SC ranks in top 5 for shark attacks, new study says. What are the odds you’ll be next?

Afraid of sharks? Here are 12 tips to reduce your chances of getting attacked

Shark attacks are a rare occurrence, but there are a few things you can do to reduce your chances of getting bit—besides staying out of the ocean.
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Shark attacks are a rare occurrence, but there are a few things you can do to reduce your chances of getting bit—besides staying out of the ocean.

For people seeking relief from the South Carolina heat, a new study might make you think twice before jumping into the ocean to cool off.

That’s because the state ranks third in the United States for the number of shark attacks reported in the past decade, according to findings published Monday on SafeWise, a website that shares tips for staying out of harm.

Just this year, sharks have been caught on camera in North Myrtle Beach and near a boat in Georgetown, The Sun News reported.

Off the shores of neighboring North Carolina, at least three people were attacked by sharks in June, according to The News & Observer.

Since 2010, there have been 38 “unprovoked” South Carolina shark attacks reported to Global Shark Attack File, according to SafeWise data gathered through June.

And in the past 20 years, 66 of the violent encounters occurred in the state’s waters, the safety website says.

So, how likely is it that someone will get attacked?

The odds are about 1 in 11.5 million, according to data from the University of Florida’s museum.

To lower the risk of shark attacks, experts advise people to stay close to shore and in groups, according to information published on North Carolina State University’s website.

Swimmers should also avoid splashing or bleeding in the water, wearing shiny accessories, being off shore at dusk or dawn and staying in areas where sharks have been spotted, the online post says.

Overall, SafeWise says Florida took the top spot for shark attacks, with more than 400 reported in the past two decades.

The new shark findings come just before Shark Week programming kicks off Sunday on the Discovery Channel.

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