Opinion

Children take to links

Who knows, one of the young golfers in the Operation Help One Another program could be the next Tiger Woods.

Operation Help One Another is a nonprofit organiza-tion that helps educate and mentor under-privileged young people in a variety of ways. And one of the skills now being learned by a group of about 30 young people is golf.

Sherman Porterfield, who runs Operation Help One Another, has been taking kids to the Carolina Crossing golf course every Sunday for the past few months and teaching them the fundamentals of the game. He hopes it will help build their self-esteem, give them a goal to shoot for and, of course, let them have some fun.

All this costs money. Porterfield hopes to raise about $10,000 to help pay for the weekly trips to the golf course and a tournament at the end, which will include a $500 scholarship for the winner. The money covers transportation to and from the course, golf shirts and shoes, clubs, lunches and fees.

We think this is a terrific program. It teaches these young people a sport they can play as part of teams in high school and college, and a pastime they can pursue the rest of their lives. And for children who ordinarily couldn't afford to play the game, these Sunday trips to the golf course are a journey outside the confines of their daily lives.

We salute Porterfield and others involved in this program, and hope they are successful in raising the money they need. If you want to help, send checks to Operation Help One Another with "golf tournament" in the memo line to: Operation Help One Another; P.O. Box 37371; Rock Hill, S.C. 29732.

IN SUMMARY

Program offers underprivileged kids and teens an opportunity to learn to play golf.

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