Sports

Ankiel and Glaus linked to pharmacy

NEW YORK -- Major League Baseball asked Friday to meet with Rick Ankiel and Troy Glaus after the pair were accused of receiving performance-enhancing drugs from a Florida pharmacy under investigation for illegally distributing prescription medications.

Ankiel, who has hit nine homers since rejoining the St. Louis Cardinals last month, received eight shipments of human growth hormone from January to December 2004, the Daily News reported Friday.

Glaus, a four-time All-Star now with the Toronto Blue Jays, received multiple shipments of nandrolone and testosterone between September 2003 and May 2004, SI.com reported.

Ankiel and Glaus both have had careers interrupted by injuries.

Ankiel, a former pitcher turned outfielder, overcame elbow and knee injuries and made it back to the majors last month for the first time in three years.

Glaus led the AL with 47 homers in 2000 and was MVP of the 2002 World Series for the Anaheim Angels, then missed large stretches in 2003 and 2004 because of shoulder problems.

• The union for minor league umpires said its members will let Major League Baseball perform background checks, a move the commissioner's office requested in the wake of the NBA's referee betting scandal.

While the Association of Minor League Umpires originally balked, it agreed after MLB put in writing how the checks would be conducted and what they would be used for.

• PRO FOOTBALL -- A federal judge tossed out a lawsuit accusing the NFL players' union of inadequately representing 3,500 retired players, ruling the complaints fraud and antitrust allegations had little merit.

One of the many reasons U.S. District Court Judge William Alsup said he dismissed the lawsuit was because none of the three retired players who sued the NFL Players Association earlier this year could show they signed any formal marketing agreements with the union in the last four years, the length of the statute of limitations.

Alsup did give the retired players who sued a glimmer of hope by saying they could revise their lawsuit to address some of the many defects he identified in his 24-page decision issued.

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