Sports

Boston College moves up to No. 2 in BCS; LSU No. 3

NEW YORK -- With its toughest test yet just days away, Boston College moved into second-place behind Ohio State in the BCS standings Sunday.

Don't look back BC, third-place LSU gained ground this week and two Pac-10 teams are primed to pounce if the teams ahead of them falter.

With Boston College playing at Virginia Tech, which is eighth in the standings, on Thursday night, the Eagles stay at No. 2 could be as short as South Florida's.

The Hokies are the highest ranked team BC has faced this season.

The Buckeyes (8-0), who are No. 1 in the Harris and coaches' polls, lead the Bowl Championship Series standings for the second consecutive week with an average of .976 out of a possible 1.000.

Boston College (7-0), which is tops in the computer ratings, took advantage of South Florida's loss last Thursday night at Rutgers and moved up one spot. The Eagles have a BCS average of .950. LSU (.911 average) also moved up a spot and closed in on the Eagles.

• PRO BASKETBALL -- Charlotte Bobcats reserve forward Adam Morrison is likely done for the season after an MRI exam revealed a torn ligament in his left knee.

The injury occurred with about 5 1/2 minutes left in the third quarter of Saturday night's 113-93 loss to the Los Angeles Lakers. Morrison was attempting to defend Luke Walton on a drive to the basket and crumpled to the floor in severe pain while clutching his left knee.

Morrison, the third overall pick in the 2006 NBA draft, was the top scorer in college basketball two seasons ago with Gonzaga -- averaging 28.1 points. As an NBA rookie, he averaged 11.8 points in 78 games. He was expected to play a significant role in a smaller lineup Coach Sam Vincent was going to employ once the season began. As one of the first two players off the bench, Morrison was expected to play about 20-25 minutes a game and contribute 14-16 points.

Morrison is being paid nearly $3.25 million this season after making $3 last season under terms of the NBA's rookie pay scale. The team has the option to renew the contract in years three and four of the deal.

• PRO FOOTBALL -- Max McGee, the free-spirited Green Bay Packers receiver who became part of Super Bowl lore after a night on the town, died when he fell while clearing leaves from the roof of his home. He was 75.

Police were called to his home in suburban Deephaven on Saturday afternoon, Sgt. Chris Whiteside said. Efforts to resuscitate failed.

McGee caught the first touchdown pass in Super Bowl history in 1967, a game he expected to watch from the sideline. When it was over, he had caught seven passes for 138 yards and two TDs and Green Bay -- coached by the great Vince Lombardi -- had beaten the Kansas City Chiefs 35-10.

• PRO BASEBALL -- Cleveland Indians pitcher Paul Byrd acknowledged using human growth hormone for a medical condition, but said he never took the drug without a doctor's prescription.

Byrd, whose win in Game 4 of the ALCS moved the Indians within one victory of the World Series, bought nearly $25,000 worth of HGH and syringes from 2002-05, the San Francisco Chronicle reported.

• Yankees general manager Brian Cashman was due in Tampa, Fla., today to start interviewing candidates to replace Joe Torre as manager.

Former Florida Marlins manager Joe Girardi, Yankees bench coach Don Mattingly and New York first base coach Tony Pena were the first three candidates invited to interview for the job, which opened last Thursday when Torre refused the Yankees' offer of a $5 million, one-year contract.

• PRO TENNIS -- Roger Federer should have seen it coming. One by one, David Nalbandian was picking off the best that tennis has to offer.

Nalbandian beat Federer 1-6, 6-3, 6-3 to win the Madrid Masters. On his way to the final against the world's top-ranked player, Nalbandian also defeated No. 2 Rafael Nadal and No. 3 Novak Djokovic.

Federer fell to 6-4 in finals this season. He was playing in his first tournament since winning his fourth straight U.S. Open six weeks ago. This was Federer's first loss on indoor hard courts since Nalbandian rallied to win at the Masters Cup in China nearly two years ago.

• AUTO RACING -- Kimi Raikkonen is known as "The Iceman," and he more than kept his cool. He won the Brazilian Grand Prix and captured the Formula One title in the tightest race for the championship in 21 years.

The Ferrari driver rallied from third place in the points standings for his first F1 crown, taking advantage of Lewis Hamilton's mistake on the first lap and Fernando Alonso's disappointing run.

Raikkonen grabbed the lead with 21 laps to go and was followed by teammate Felipe Massa. Alonso, Hamilton's McLaren teammate, finished third.

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