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West Nile virus case in Rock Hill, officials say. Mosquito spraying set near downtown

These are the mosquitoes that cause West Nile virus. Here’s how they find them

The Pocket neighborhood in Sacramento was identified by the local vector control district as an area of concern for West Nile virus in June 2018. The district is considering aerial spraying in the area.
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The Pocket neighborhood in Sacramento was identified by the local vector control district as an area of concern for West Nile virus in June 2018. The district is considering aerial spraying in the area.

Spraying for mosquitoes will be done Saturday near downtown Rock Hill after a confirmed case of West Nile virus.

Officials with York County and the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control said Friday afternoon that one person has a confirmed case of the virus, according to a statement from the York County Manager’s Office.

Spraying will be done Saturday in a 1-mile radius of Moore Street, Whitner Street and Hampton Street, according to Trish Startup, spokesperson for York County.

Those streets are just south of downtown Rock Hill.

Contractors will spray from the roads, Startup said. Spraying will begin around 2 a.m. and should take about five hours, she said.

“The contractor will use a product called Envion RTU,” York County officials said. “While the material is not harmful to people, pets, other insects, and gardens, it’s not recommended to be directly in the path of the spray.”

Beekeepers within the 1-mile radius are advised to cover hives, officials said.

Spraying after a case of West Nile virus is discovered has happened at least three times in York County since 2017. Spraying was done after confirmed West Nile cases in Rock Hill and Fort Mill, officials said.

Officials also recommended trying to stop mosquitoes by eliminating areas of standing water, using insect repellent, keeping skin covered, and closing windows and doors.

Officials said that according to DHEC website, most people infected with West Nile virus have no symptoms. The risk of serious illness is low. More information about the virus, including symptoms, treatment and prevention, is available at https://scdhec.gov/health/diseases-conditions/insect-or-animal-borne-disease/infectious-diseases-diseases-spread-2.

To learn more about protecting yourself from mosquitos, please visit the SCDHEC website at www.scdhec.gov. For any questions or concerns regarding the mosquito control spraying effort, call 803-325-2500.

Fight mosquitoes inside and outside with a few simple tips. Remember to cover windows with screens, remove standing water, and cover your skin with long sleeves shirt and pants. And don't forget insect repellent.

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Andrew Dys covers breaking news and public safety for The Herald, where he has been a reporter and columnist since 2000. He has won 51 South Carolina Press Association awards for his coverage of crime, race, justice, and people. He is author of the book “Slice of Dys” and his work is in the U.S. Library of Congress.
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