Fort Mill Times

More homes, townhomes and commercial proposed where Fort Mill and Indian Land meet.

A collector road study is in the works through the Rock Hill-Fort Mill Area Transportation Study to address U.S. 521 traffic.
A collector road study is in the works through the Rock Hill-Fort Mill Area Transportation Study to address U.S. 521 traffic. Herald file photo

Folks wanting to live or work right where Fort Mill and Indian Land meet may soon have another option.

New Bern, N.C.-based UHF Development Group is looking to rezone six properties at more than 75 acres along Doby’s Bridge Road at the Lancaster and York counties line. The change would swap low-density residential zoning for a mixed use district allowing for a master planned community of single-family homes, townhomes and commercial space.

A site plan hasn’t been submitted, but county development standards allow for up to 12 attached dwelling units per acre in the residential mixed use zoning developers are seeking, or up to nine detached units per acre.

The site has some existing homes and vacant land. Indian Land High School sits just to the north. The site is part of the Carolina Thread Trail Overlay and a natural surface trail would connect the new neighborhood with surrounding schools.

A collector road study is in the works through the Rock Hill-Fort Mill Area Transportation Study to address U.S. 521 traffic there, a stated problem area for RFATS both with existing and future traffic demand. A collector road would need to be part of an approved development.

“Staff would only recommend approval of this project if the collector road is built to help accommodate traffic in the area,” reads the county staff recommendation to its planning commission.

The proposal is the first applicant seeking a mixed use district since a new unified development ordinance was approved by the county in November. The rezonings take a public hearing with the planning commission and three Lancaster County Council readings.

The applicant also has to submit a master development plan application. A technical review committee would look at it and the planning commission would hold another public hearing and recommend approval or approval with conditions to Council.

Council would then approve, approve with conditions or deny the master plan in a single vote.

“This rezoning is only one step of many with the master development plan process,” reads the county staff writeup.

County staff is recommending approval of the rezoning. The planning commission meets April 18. The 6:30 p.m. meeting at the Lancaster County Administration Building includes time for citizen comments.

In a separate Indian Land item the same night, the commission will hear plans for an almost 32-acre rezoning to a light industrial district. PCI Group wants to bring the property at 11632 Harrisburg Road back to its original zoning before a new countywide zoning map is adopted in November. It currently has an industrial building on it.

  Comments