Fort Mill Times

Donor sponsors art camp for Paradise kids

Latrelle Taylor, 4, paints what he named his Godzilla Minion at a recent art camp held at Olive’s Art Studio sponsored by SON Ministries.
Latrelle Taylor, 4, paints what he named his Godzilla Minion at a recent art camp held at Olive’s Art Studio sponsored by SON Ministries.

Twenty kids from Fort Mill’s Paradise community participated in a recent two-day art camp at Olive’s Art Studio on Main Street, thanks to SON Ministries and an anonymous donor.

Art instructor Rick Crowley guided the students in painting and creating clay Minions, made to look like those from this summer’s popular movie of the same name.

While many of the children’s designs closely mimicked the yellow, glasses-wearing and peculiar looking characters, others took on personas all their own.

“There wasn’t a wrong one and there wasn’t a right one, they’re all beautiful,” SON Ministries founder Kim Vinesett said. “We explained that was the purpose. There’s no mistakes. We linked it to our faith. God made each of us unique.”

Latrelle Taylor, 4, shyly sucked his thumb and painted quietly.

“He’s making a Godzilla minion,” said Vinesett.

SON and the donor, “someone who loves art, children and education,” wanted to make this event possible for children who otherwise would not have the chance, she said.

The children were chosen for the camp based on a drawing. SON solicited applications at the Second Harvest Food Bank distributions, at the Summer Feeding Program at Steele Street Park and on Wednesdays at the Community Café at Fort Mill Community Bible Church.

“It was sort of a prerequisite that they were from (Paradise),” which has a higher concentration of low income households compared to elsewhere in Fort Mill, Vinesett said.

Crowley, the art instructor, said he loved being with the children and knowing that he was able to “give an opportunity to these kids.”

“A lot of times, underprivileged kids are way more excited and appreciative,” Crowley said.

Participating in activities like this during the summer keeps the children “doing something positive and productive,” Vinesett said.

Lachyna Burns, 14, said making a Minion was the most memorable part of camp.

“I like making art,” she said.

  Comments