Crime

Details of Crazy Horse shooting in Rock Hill revealed during Morgan’s bond hearing

A circuit court judge on Thursday denied bond for David Morgan, who is accused of shooting at two people after being kicked out of a Rock Hill night club last week. Morgan was represented at Thursday’s hearing by Fort Mill attorney John Freeman, left.
A circuit court judge on Thursday denied bond for David Morgan, who is accused of shooting at two people after being kicked out of a Rock Hill night club last week. Morgan was represented at Thursday’s hearing by Fort Mill attorney John Freeman, left. tkulmala@heraldonline.com

David “Chilli Bean” Morgan will remain in jail on attempted murder and weapons charges stemming from a shooting at a Rock Hill night club, a circuit judge ruled Thursday, calling Morgan “a danger to the community and a danger to himself.”

Morgan, 45, is charged with two counts of attempted murder and one count each of a felon in possession of a firearm, unlawful carry of a firearm and possession of a weapon during a violent crime. He is the father of NFL player Jadeveon Clowney, a former South Carolina Gamecock and South Pointe High School football star who now plays for the Houston Texans.

The charges against Morgan stem from an Aug. 4 incident at the Crazy Horse Showclub on Cherry Road where, police say, Morgan fired multiple gunshots at one of the club’s managers after being kicked out of the club. A Rock Hill magistrate denied bond for Morgan the following day and approved him for a public defender.

Judge denies bond for David Morgan, the man accused of shooting at two people after being kicked out of the Crazy Horse Showclub in Rock Hill. Morgan is the father of NFL player Jadeveon Clowney, who grew up in Rock Hill. (video by Teddy Kulmala)

New details about the shooting came out at Thursday’s bond hearing.

Morgan had been at the club and was “causing a disturbance,” so the club’s manager asked him to leave about 12:30 a.m., Assistant 16th Circuit Solicitor Jennifer Desch said during Thursday’s hearing. She said Morgan returned about 1:50 a.m. when the club was closing, confronted the manager and told him he had a gun. The manager told Morgan he was also armed and had a permit and again asked him to leave.

Morgan, who was with another person, reportedly departed, walking toward a wooded area at the back of the building.

Desch said at that point Morgan held his arms up and appeared ready to shoot.

“At that point, there was another warning, and then a shot was fired from Mr. Morgan toward the manager.”

The manager’s girlfriend said she felt something go through her hair, Desch said. Morgan ignored another warning by the manager and again fired. The manager returned fire.

“Gunfire was exchanged, and it was Mr. Morgan who was actually hit,” Desch said.

Police later found Morgan at Piedmont Medical Center with a gunshot wound to the shoulder.

Morgan stood quietly during Thursday’s hearing, speaking only to his lawyer in whispers. Fort Mill attorney John Freeman cited Morgan’s Rock Hill roots and family support as one reason to grant bond.

“He’s from Rock Hill. He’s been here his whole life,” Freeman said. “He has one child who is grown. He has another child on the way with his girlfriend. He has family support in this area.”

Freeman said Morgan was working up until he was injured on the job in October, and he has a pending worker’s compensation claim.

“He wants to get out,” Freeman said. “He wants to finish his worker’s comp case and get back to work, be a father to the child that’s on the way.”

In 1995, Morgan was sentenced to 15 years in prison after convictions for burglary and other crimes. His criminal record that dates back to 1987. It includes convictions for trespassing, damage to property, resisting arrest, grand larceny and other crimes, according to state records.

He has been charged with two traffic offenses since his release from prison but no felonies, according to the State Law Enforcement Division. In April, Morgan was fined after he was convicted in Fort Mill magistrate court for driving too fast for conditions.

Desch acknowledged that Morgan has not faced any serious charges in the last 20 years but said his record still shows a history of violence. She said the victims fear for their safety if Morgan is released.

“There is a history of violence before you that is concerning,” she said. “The fact that he would leave ... and return with friends and a firearm is what’s most concerning.”

Freeman asked Circuit Court Judge John C. Hayes III to reconsider his decision.

“I find he is a danger to the community,” Hayes said. “And a danger to himself.”

  Comments