South Carolina

Clinton hopes to wash away 2008’s bitter taste

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton attends The Hillary Rodham Clinton Awards for Advancing Women in Peace and Security, in the Riggs Library at Georgetown University in Washington on April 22.
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton attends The Hillary Rodham Clinton Awards for Advancing Women in Peace and Security, in the Riggs Library at Georgetown University in Washington on April 22. AP

Hillary Clinton’s Wednesday visit to South Carolina will end a long absence after her bruising presidential primary loss in 2008 to then-U.S. Sen. Barack Obama.

Clinton will be back in South Carolina, giving the keynote speech at the 2015 Day in Blue, an annual Columbia gathering of the S.C. Democratic Women’s Council and the S.C. House Democratic Women’s Caucus. She also will meet privately with minority business leaders and the S.C. House and Senate Democratic caucuses.

The visit is a chance for the former first lady, former U.S. senator from New York and former secretary of state to reconnect with S.C. Democrats after the brutal 2008 primary.

In that contest, Clinton and her husband, former President Bill Clinton, criticized Obama in ways that some critics said were racially charged, leading to a bitter falling-out between the Clintons and some of the state’s top Democrats.

Those moments, combined with Obama’s early-state win in Iowa, helped move Democratic voters away from Clinton and into Obama’s camp, helping propel him to a two-term presidency, political scientists say.

The 2016 primary is shaping up more favorably for Clinton, who will not face opponents – actual or wanna-be – with the same political potency of the history-making Obama. This time, the chance to make history in the Democratic Party lies with Clinton, who could become the first woman to win the White House.

Clinton’s challenge in the South, said Furman political scientist Teresa Cosby, will to build excitement for her party, secure the women’s vote and take care not to run “a campaign that suppresses her turnout” by turning off African-American voters.

A rough loss

The 2008 Democratic primary was rocky.

Obama nearly swept the Palmetto State, taking 44 of 46 counties and winning 55 percent of the vote to Clinton’s 27 percent.

Clinton started out as a frontrunner for the Democratic nomination until Obama won Iowa, signaling to Democratic voters that they, perhaps, could elect a black president.

But Clinton and her husband – the former president, dubbed the “first black president” by African-American author Toni Morrison – also disrupted her path to victory. The couple was accused of injecting race into the contest as they moved to counter Obama’s appeal and highlight his inexperience.

When Bill Clinton referred to parts of Obama’s campaign as a “fairy tale,” the comment “really aggravated the African-American voter,” said Furman’s Cosby.

“I don’t think (Clinton) meant that the potential for an African-American president was a fairy tale, but the potential of a newcomer like Obama was a fairy tale,” Cosby said.

Clinton’s statement “focused a critique on the Clintons that they had never had before” and “swung a number of Clinton voters, on the fence, toward Obama,” she said.

In South Carolina, Bill Clinton also reminded reporters that Jesse Jackson had won Democratic presidential contests in the state twice in the 1980s – a comment some Democrats saw as an attempt to highlight Obama’s race and lessen his appeal to white Southerners.

Clinton supporter Sally Howard — former chairwoman of the Democratic Party in Horry County, the only county Clinton carried in 2008 — said she remembered that moment the most from the campaign.

“Emotions and tempers (ran) hot,” Howard said, adding Clinton made a “factual statement” that was interpreted as a “slur” by some in the party.

‘Out there at the Waffle House’

So far in the 2016 race, Clinton is light-years ahead of any Democratic challengers in the polls.

U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders, an independent and self-styled socialist from Vermont, is running.

Former Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley, who has allies in the Palmetto State, is expected to announce he is running May 30 in Baltimore. Former Rhode Island Gov. Lincoln Chafee and former U.S. Sen. Jim Webb of Virginia also may enter the race.

Hillary Clinton in S.C.

What: The Democratic presidential hopeful is the keynote speaker at the S.C. Democratic Women’s Council and the S.C. House Democratic Women’s Caucus 2015 Day in Blue

Where: Columbia Marriott, Main and Hampton streets

When: 1:45 p.m. Wednesday

Private meetings: Clinton also will meet privately with minority business owners and the S.C. House and Senate Democratic caucuses

The Clintons in S.C.

How Hillary Clinton and her husband, former President Bill Clinton, have fared at the polls in S.C.

44 percent: Former President Clinton’s showing at S.C. polls in November 1996, losing the state by 6 percentage points. That was better than 1992, when Clinton lost the state by 8 percentage points. It also was better than 2000, 2004, 2008 and 2012, when the Democratic nominee lost the state by 16 percentage points, 17 percentage points, 9 percentage points and 11 percentage points.

27 percent: Hillary Clinton’s showing in the state’s 2008 Democratic primary, finishing a distant second to U.S. Sen. Barack Obama, who won 58 percent. Obama won every county in the state except for Horry, which Clinton won, and Oconee, which native son John Edwards won.

  Comments