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Rock Hill is asking customers to use less water -- for now. Heat’s not the only reason.

How to harvest rain for your yard

You can save rain to use later to recharge soil moisture, cut down on outside water use and create lasting savings on irrigation. Which of the methods you use depends on space and how much money you want to spend on the project. Here are some tips
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You can save rain to use later to recharge soil moisture, cut down on outside water use and create lasting savings on irrigation. Which of the methods you use depends on space and how much money you want to spend on the project. Here are some tips

Add Rock Hill to the list of areas asking residents to use less water.

The city wants customers to cut water use by 3% to 5%. The cutbacks are voluntary.

The city has offered a variety of tips online for how to go about it, from a max gallon per day usage to reduced outdoor washing to irrigating at off peak times.

The city is working to add capacity to its Cherry Road filter plant which could cause temporary distribution issues. Coupled with the hot summer months when there is high use and evaporation, the city wants to plan ahead.

Tips include:

Try to limit water use during peak demand periods.

Voluntarily reduce residential water use to a maximum of 350 gallons per household per day.

Use low-volume, drip irrigation and handheld watering to reduce the use of sprinklers, irrigation systems or other remote landscape watering devices.

In order to minimize evaporation, water the lawn at night or in the early morning, and don’t forget to mulch.

Check your irrigation/sprinkler system frequently to avoid watering the street or sidewalk. Don’t water your lawn on windy days.

Adjust your lawn mower to a higher setting. Longer grass shades root systems and holds soil moisture better than a closely clipped lawn.

Use a rain gauge to track how much rain your yard receives.

Limit watering to no more than two days per week.

Reduce washing down of sidewalks, walkways, driveways, parking lots, tennis courts and other hard surfaced areas.

Reduce washing down buildings for purposes other than immediate fire protection.

Reduce flushing of gutters.

Reduce residential washing of vehicles. Use car washes that use recycled water instead of washing vehicles at home.

Rock Hill isn’t alone in asking for reduced water usage. Just prior to Memorial Day, Blue Granite Water Company asked Lake Wylie residents to start conserving. The company since put mandatory restrictions in place on outdoor uses through at least Oct. 1. Tega Cay also asked customers to cut back about the same time, amid high demand and low rainfall.

Rock Hill draws its water from Lake Wylie, then sells it to York County, Fort Mill and other places. Much of York County including Lake Wylie and Tega Cay gets water that comes, via different users along the way, from Rock Hill’s intake.

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