Crime

Rock Hill man trafficked meth pills shaped like Red Bull cans and dollar bills

Consequences for drug-related arrests in South Carolina

Dozens of people are charged with drug-related charges each month in Horry County. Here are the consequences if you are caught with drugs in South Carolina.
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Dozens of people are charged with drug-related charges each month in Horry County. Here are the consequences if you are caught with drugs in South Carolina.

A Rock Hill man was sentenced to 18 years in a South Carolina prison after a jury convicted him of trafficking meth shaped into pills that looked like Red Bull cans and dollar bills, according to prosecutors and court records.

LaGerald Feon Dunham, 39, had 101 of the pills when he was stopped by police in May 2017, said Matthew Hogge, 16th Circuit assistant solicitor. Some of the pills were shaped like miniature cans and others were pressed into the shape of tiny money, Hogge said.

Rock Hill Police Department officers originally charged Dunham with trafficking a different illegal drug called Ecstasy, Hogge said. South Carolina’s State Law Enforcement Division lab testing found the pills were meth, Hogge said.

According to the federal government National Institute on Drug Abuse, meth is “a powerful, highly addictive stimulant that affects the central nervous system.”

A SLED expert testified at the trial last week in York at the Moss Justice Center that it is becoming more common to find illegal meth pressed into these type of pills, Hogge said.

This conviction for trafficking meth is the third time in the 16 years that Dunham was been convicted of drug offenses. He was sentenced to 10 years for drugs in 2003, then four years in 2011, according to York County court records and prosecutors.

Geoff Dunn, Dunham’s lawyer, said after the trial that Dunham will appeal.

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Andrew Dys covers breaking news and public safety for The Herald, where he has been a reporter and columnist since 2000. He has won 51 South Carolina Press Association awards for his coverage of crime, race, justice, and people. He is author of the book “Slice of Dys” and his work is in the U.S. Library of Congress.
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